Category: Mountaineering


Avalanches killed 35 climbers on Mount Everest the past two years — including 16 in one devastating day in 2014. At least one person has died climbing the mountain in Nepal every year since 1900.
And now the 2016 climbing season has claimed its first victims.
Since last Thursday four people have died on the 29,035-foot peak, including a Sherpa. Rescue efforts are ongoing for two other missing climbers.
“Everest is a mountain of extremes,” said Jon Kedrowski, a geographer and climber who summited Mount Everest in 2012, when 10 climbers died. “At altitude, the body deteriorates on a certain level.
The recent deaths — coming so quickly on the heels of one another — have rattled climbers who are beginning their descent as the Everest climbing season nears its end. April and May are the most common months to attempt a climb because there tends to be less wind. Regardless, the climate on the mountain is brutal. Temperatures range from -31 to -4 Fahrenheit.
April was the first month of climbing since all ascent was halted after the catastrophic earthquake that struck Nepal in 2015 and a deadly avalanche that killed 16 Sherpas in one day in 2014. More than 200 climbers have died since Tenzing Norgay and Edmund Hillary made the first official ascent in 1953.
And yet the hopefuls keep coming. More than 400 people have attempted the Everest climb this season, including 288 foreigners and more than 100 Sherpas and guides, said Sudarshan Dhakal, director of the Nepal Tourism Department. That’s more than the average for previous seasons, he said.

Source: Four climbers dead on Everest, ‘mountain of extremes’ – CNN.com

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Maria Strydom, 34, was among 30 climbers including her husband who fell ill or suffered from frostbite as they tried up the world’s tallest peak over the weekend.

She and her husband were planning to scale seven of the world’s peaks to prove vegans were not “malnourished and weak”.

But the South African academic tragically died after she was forced to turn back on the final leg of her epic journey.

She is also the third mountaineer to die in the first Everest climbing season since a major earthquake rocked Nepal last year.

Dr Strydom, a lecturer at Monash University in Mebourne, Australia, was an experienced climber who had previously scaled several vast mountain tops – inclusion Mount Ararat in Turkey.

Joined by husband Robert Gropel, the couple were attempting to climb the highest peak in each of the seven continents to disprove claims vegans often struggle with extreme activities.

In a post on her university’s website in March, she said: “It seems that people have this warped idea of vegans being malnourished and weak.

Source: Academic climbing Everest in vegan mission died before reaching summit | World | News | Daily Express

The bodies of a renowned American climber and an expedition cameraman have been found more than 16 years after they were killed in an avalanche in the Himalayas.

Climbers attempting to reach the summit of Shishapangma in Tibet discovered the bodies of Alex Lowe and David Bridges encased in ice on a glacier.

The bodies had clothing and backpacks that matched the gear Mr Lowe and Mr Bridges were wearing when they disappeared in 1999, the Alex Lowe Charitable Foundation said in a statement.

The pair died after they were swept away during a trek that aimed to ski down the 26,291ft (8,013m) peak – the world’s 14th highest.

A third climber, Conrad Anker, was injured but survived.

NBC News reported that the bodies were found last week.

In a statement, Mr Lowe’s widow Jenni Lowe-Anker said: “Alex and David vanished, were captured and frozen in time. Now they are found.

“We are thankful. Conrad, the boys and I will make our pilgrimage to Shishapangma. It is time to put Alex to rest.”

Mr Anker, who married Mr Lowe’s widow in 2001, said the discovery “brings closure and relief for me and Jenni and for our family”.

Mr Lowe’s accomplishments included two climbs to the top of Mount Everest, several first ascents in Antarctica and dozens of less prominent but highly technical ascents.

The foundation bearing his name provides advice and financial support to humanitarian programmes that operate in remote parts of the world.

Source: Bodies Of Famed Climbers Found 16 Years On

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