Fetal Alcohol Syndrome

Noun

1.
A condition in which body deformation or facial development or mental
ability of a fetus is impaired because the mother drank alcohol while
pregnant.

Source: WordNet 1.7.1 Copyright © 2001 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

Women should drink no alcohol during the first three months of
pregnancy, despite uncertainty over whether the odd drink could harm
their baby, a government watchdog said on Wednesday.

The National
Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) said there was
limited evidence that drinking in the early stages of pregnancy may be
linked to a higher risk of miscarriage.

Its
new guidance says that pregnant women who choose to drink should limit
their intake to one or two units, once or twice a week.

One unit equals half a pint of beer or a single shot of spirits, while a small glass (125 ml) of wine has 1.5 units.

While
it is generally agreed that pregnant women should not drink to excess,
studies have failed to find the exact level at which moderate alcohol
consumption harms the foetus, the watchdog said.

"There is no
evidence of a threshold level of alcohol consumption during pregnancy
above which alcohol is harmful to the baby," the guidance says. "It
would appear that drinking no more than 1.5 units per day is not
associated with harm to the baby."